When:
October 12, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
2019-10-12T19:00:00-08:00
2019-10-12T21:00:00-08:00
Where:
Firehouse Studios
656 7th Ave
Fairbanks, AK 99701
USA
Cost:
$20
Wild & Scenic Film Festival @ Firehouse Studios | Fairbanks | Alaska | United States

We’re hosting the Wild & Scenic Film Festival for the 2nd year in a row. The festival brings together educational & energizing films to inspire activism and celebrate the natural world. We’ve chosen 10 films for this Fairbanks fundraising event to benefit the Northern Center. We’re excited to share them with you!

Buy your tickets online at http://bit.ly/wsff19 or at the door.

If you can come early, stop by to see Paving Tundra and learn more about commenting on the DEIS on the Ambler road. 

This year’s film selections:

Blue
Fresh off training wheels, a four-year-old growing up in Valdez, Alaska begins to push her boundaries and explore what’s possible on her bike, her eyes naturally drifting to the mountains.
Blue is a fantastical journey into a young girl’s imagination and a testament to the inherent creativity, innovation, and strength forged in women of the north.

American Psychosis
Pulitzer-prize winning journalist, author and activist Chris Hedges discusses modern day consumerism, totalitarian corporate power, and living in a culture dominated by pervasive illusion.

Chandalar
On a clear morning in Portland, Oregon, fourteen youth with oversized backpacks await a long day of travel. Along with five veterans, a few volunteers and “Axe the Service Dog,” they are headed to Fairbanks, Alaska. From there they will pile into bush planes and fly into the Arctic Circle.

This is Soul River, a non-profit organization founded by decorated Navy veteran Chad Brown, and their three-week deployment to the Chandalar River is the culmination of outdoor conservation education, collective strengthening, leadership development, healing, and a whole lot of fly fishing.

Camera Trap
Peter Mather is a teacher who started his career in the tiny northern community of Old Crow. It was there he developed a passion for the plight of the caribou and the people whose culture is tied to them. An aspiring wilderness photographer, Peter sets out on a quest to document the herd, its migrations, and the role it plays in communities across the north. But he needs one epic shot – the one that will capture the significance of the herd and inspire others to protect it. Camera Trap is an intimate portrait of Peter, exploring what is behind his obsession with protecting the Porcupine herd and the lengths he will go to get the perfect shot.

For the Love of Mary
First-time 97-year-old runner, George Etzweiler, completed the race up the northeast’s tallest peak, Mount Washington, when he was 69 years old. Despite having a pacemaker, the State College, Pennsylvania resident competes in the grueling 7.6-mile race up nearly 4,700 feet of paved road, breaking his own record each year for the oldest finisher. In addition to his ancient, lucky, green running shorts, Etzweiler carries something else special with him: The memory of his late wife of 68 years, Mary.

A New View of the Moon
Become reacquainted with awe alongside strangers interacting with a telescope trained on the moon. Watch as Wylie Overstreet takes a telescope around the streets of Los Angeles to give passersby an up-close look at a familiar object: a new view of the moon.

Sacred Strides
Bears Ears National Monument is one of the most talked-about public lands under threat, though the dialogue often glosses over how sacred it is to many Native Americans. In March 2018, a group of tribes put their differences aside and came together to run 800 miles to Bears Ears – and to send a message of unity. The Sacred Strides for Healing Prayer Run wove from tribal homelands across the Southwest to Bears Ears. Watch to meet the people who are participating in the public lands conversation with their feet and learn about why this land is so important to them.

Colors of Change
Experience Greenland through the eyes of Artist Zaria Forman, NASA scientist John Sonntag, and Inuit Elder Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq “Uncle” as art, culture, and science collide in a region defined by climate change.

Zaria travels to Greenland for inspiration for her next body of work and to visit the fjord where she spread her mother’s ashes. Sonntag is the lead scientist for Operation IceBridge, gathering information on the ice sheet. Uncle speaks for the ice and recalls when his elders saw the “big ice” melting for the first time in the 1960s.

Chasing Wild: Journey into Sacred Headwaters
Three friends set off on a 400km bike packing and packraft expedition through the heart of the sacred headwaters in northwestern British Columbia, birthplace of three critical salmon rivers, and home to the Tahltan people. In the wake of the devastating Mount Polley Mine disaster, the team’s goal is to understand what is at stake as a wave of new mines are developed across this remote corner of the province. Their journey offers an exciting and sobering window into this wild landscape as they pedal through vast boreal forest, paddle frigid whitewater, battle monster trout, outrun a grizzly, learn about the Tahltan’s fight to protect their homeland, and glimpse inside a massive open pit mine.

Mothered by Mountains
Pasang Lhamu Sherpa Akita, Nepal’s leading female mountain guide, has been on top of the tallest peaks on Earth. When she teams up to make a first ascent with an unlikely partner – local punk-rock icon, Sareena Rai – they both find that the paths to the greatest summits lie within.